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election today in Oklahoma City
Oklahoma City residents have a chance to vote Tuesday, July 9, 2019. (Screenshot)

(Update: Unofficial vote totals from the Oklahoma State Election board indicate that Oklahoma City voters approved both proposals on the July 9, 2019, ballot.)

Voters in Oklahoma City can cast ballots today from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at their normal polling locations on two issues: a change to the city’s charter and a proposed change to the city’s Oklahoma Natural Gas franchise agreement.

The municipal charter proposal deals with employment regulations for OKC city councilpersons. From the city’s website about the election today in Oklahoma City:

The proposed Charter amendment on employment restrictions would allow more state and federal government employees to serve on the City Council.

The amendment would keep restrictions for elected officials and senior government officers like state legislators and school superintendents, who can’t serve on the Council. But it would allow other state and federal government employees, like teachers and engineers, to be Council members.

The amendment would take effect starting with the next election for each Council seat, not during the current term.

The City Council has nine members: the mayor, who is elected citywide, and one representative from each of the City’s eight wards.

The city’s website also describes the proposed change to the ONG franchise agreement:

The proposed change to the ONG franchise agreement clarifies the definition of gross cash receipts, which determine the franchise fees ONG pays to the City.

After negotiations, the City and ONG agreed the definition should include certain receipts the City had contended should already be included.

If the change is approved, ONG’s residential and commercial natural gas customers in Oklahoma City could see an increase in their gas bill of about 0.1 percent (10 cents on a $100 gas bill).

ONG would pay the City about $225,000 in additional annual franchise fees, an increase of about 4 percent. Franchise fees go into the City’s General Fund, which pays for day-to-day operations like police officer and firefighter salaries.

Oklahomans can confirm their voter registration by visiting the State Election Board’s website.

Sample ballot for election today in Oklahoma City