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Writers' Fund supporters
(Morguefile.com)

On April 5, we announced some changes to our crowd-sourced Writers’ Fund. The public response from readers and supporters was humbling — 10 new Writers’ Fund supporters signed up as monthly contributors and 18 others made one-time donations.

So first, let us say: Thanks for believing in our work at NonDoc.

Now, we are asking that you continue this momentum.

Help us reach our goal of adding 10 new monthly Writers’ Fund contributors by the end of this week. Doing so will support an independent, journalist-owned publication that provides a responsible public forum for news and commentary.

While several supporters have committed $20 or more per month, even $10 or just $5 per month makes a major difference in the viability of our online media model.

Your support is making a difference

For those who have committed to sustain NonDoc or who are thinking about it, we have other good news: Advertising campaigns related to civic issues in the state of Oklahoma have begun to see the value of placing ads on NonDoc.

That means they value being in front of your eyeballs, and they also appreciate the product we put out.

So your Writers’ Fund support is making a difference, and it allows us to:

  • Expand freelance content
  • Increase readership
  • Improve advertising client development
  • Expand office accommodations
  • Maximize marketing opportunities for this small business

An example of our value

Sometimes people ask what I’m most proud of concerning NonDoc. While there are a lot of small events and overarching concepts that I feel honored to help lead, one moment from the 2017 legislative session stands out as a good example of what we try to accomplish.

In late February, the Oklahoma Board of Equalization declared a second consecutive revenue failure, and media were rushing to get the complex details correct and published.

Our story went up around noon, featuring the headline Oklahoma declares revenue failure again: ‘Our situation is dire’. Readers lamented the news on social media and started a robust discussion in the article’s comments.

Two hours later, House Minority Leader Scott Inman (D-Del City) stepped up to the podium in the broadcast press room and launched into his remarks on the situation. I was crammed into the corner of the room and could see the podium in front of him. He read a quote from Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger, and, as he did so, I could see what was on the paper he was holding: a printed copy of my article on the revenue failure.

I smiled.

Hours later, I received a text from a friend who works for a state agency. It read: “FYI, Gov. Fallin is going to share your Board of Equalization story on her Facebook page.”

I smiled again.

Two politicians of different parties with different perspectives both found our NonDoc story positive, informative and worth sharing to their constituencies.

It might seem small, but to me it felt we were doing something right.

If you agree, please consider becoming a Writers’ Fund supporter.

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William W. Savage III holds a journalism degree from the University of Oklahoma. He covered two sessions of the Oklahoma Legislature for eCapitol.net before working in health care for six years. He is a nationally certified Mental Health First Aid instructor.